Martin in Gatineau Park

Martin in Gatineau Park

Wednesday, 4 December 2013

Wednesday 4 December 2013 - A Saunter from Sadgill

On a fine, bright day, Sue and I eschewed the attractions of the final stage of East Lancashire LDWA's assault on the Thirlmere Way, in favour of a short walk from Sadgill Bridge. 

The forty minute drive from Ghyll Head passed quickly, and we parked by Sadgill Bridge (pictured) next to a sign that might make anyone thinking of proceeding further by car think twice.

The sun skittered in and out of the cloud all day, resulting in hasty, often futile, grabs for the camera, which on this trip is my waterproof Lumix FT4 as the Canon G12 has broken. Hopefully there will be some pleasant images - to be made available by way of an 'overview' posting about this trip once we get home. (My apologies to complainants about the brevity of this week's postings, but socialising has come first.)

Anyway, Sue and I headed up Longsleddale into an Arctic breeze, meeting a lone dog walker with two delightful puppies near Brownhowe Bottom. We saw nobody else all day, though our route did look well walked.

We were soon on a drier than expected path beside a fence, leading to the 664 metre summit of Tarn Crag on Sleddale Fell. I'd not been there before. There's a large survey tower, and excellent views in all directions, with the track over Gatesgarth Pass to Haweswater dominant in the foreground. 

The path to Harrop Pike wasn't as wet as expected, and the expansive views from that summit were rather better than on my cloudy visit in June last year. Sue is pictured here. 

The onward path to Grey Crag, where we enjoyed lunch, then Great Howe, seemed easier than last time,  perhaps because I wasn't carrying camping gear.

Finishing at Sadgill Bridge was also somewhat easier than continuing to Burneside!

A lovely walk in great weather - 11 km with about 540 metres ascent, in 3.5 hours.

2 comments:

Alan Rayner said...

Gosh its ages since i did that neck of the woods. I must re-visit it in 2014.

Phreerunner said...

Yes, Alan, it's a fine part of the world.