Martin on Cnicht

Martin on Cnicht

Sunday, 11 September 2016

Return to Timperley

We soon realised the importance of today's date when we passed armed guards at Pisa airport. But this didn't hinder us and the day passed uneventfully. Thanks go to Penny for picking three of us up this afternoon, and to Graham for fitting our walking poles into his hold bag.

It was great to see almost as much sunshine in Timperley as there was in Italy.

Summer rolls on....

(Today's pictures were taken during the course of our relatively short journey home.)

4 comments:

AlanR said...

That 3rd photo of "Timperley on the Bridgewater" has certainly improved since they knocked Linotype down at Broadheath.

Julian Glover said...

A very interesting series of posts!

Thinking about this trip and the last, what are your overall views on the GEA as a route - how good/scenic, quality of paths, infrestructure and accommodation, ease of getting to, from and between villages, requirement to speak Italian, etc?

It looks lovely, and from your posts it seems to have everything a long-distance path could want - but maybe a bit quieter than some?

Anyway, it looks as though you enjoyed yourselves, which I guess is the most important thing for you.

Phreerunner said...

Yes Alan, the Linotype redevelopment seems to have made lots of progress in our absence, but I'm afraid it's a clever illusion. An amazing piece of street art, though!

Julian - I may do a further post covering the GEA, but Gillian's Cicerone guide, a few emails and a few phone calls were all that were needed to organise the trips. The first half, that Sue and I walked in April 2013, has quite a bit of tree cover, which is why we did it in April, but the second half that we have just walked was scenically outstanding and mostly above the tree line. The paths are well marked and pretty quiet out of season when we went. Early July may be a good time to go, with good flowers and all the facilities being open. A smattering of Italian would be an advantage.

Julian Glover said...

Thanks for the info, Martin - I'll do a bit of research over the winter, but it sounds as though Gillian's guide is the best first point of reference. Now, what was my Cicerone login ......? :-)