Sue and Martin above Zermatt - 2018

Sue and Martin above Zermatt - 2018

Saturday, 19 October 2019

Friday 18 October 2019 - A Circuit from Bollington (15 km)

 
A break in the showery weather provided an ideal morning for this stroll, starting from a car park near the centre of Bollington (see map below). The car park is currently occupied by travellers, but we found a space and set off, Sue, Graeme and I, up the familiar and very steep path to the south of the town.
 
We soon found ourselves looking down on the town (see above), and after a while we reached the whitewashed hulk of White Nancy, where a couple were picnicking, despite it only being 10.30 am.
 
White Nancy was built in 1817 to commemorate victory at the Battle of Waterloo. I've written about it before - here. Today it shimmered in the bright sunshine. Freshly whitewashed?
 
 
The three of us continued over Kerridge Hill, where there's a trig point with an extensive view over Greater Manchester and the plains of Cheshire.
 
 
We saw no other walkers today, apart from the afore-mentioned picnickers and a handful of dog walkers. But our progress was monitored by the local buzzard population.
 
After descending Tower Hill and skirting Rainow, we found ourselves on a familiar road that leads past a Very Helpful Signpost to the waterworks below Lamaload Reservoir.
 
 
Rising again, we passed isolated buildings on our way to the hamlet of Ginclough, seen below our picnic spot in the next picture. I claimed this to be the half way point of the walk, but Sue sussed that it might be a bit further than that, given the obvious proximity of White Nancy (just to the left of the picture).
 
 
My route did however head north to Rainowlow and around the back of Billinge Hill, rather than head straight back to Bollington.
 
We passed this concrete structure. There's a Tumulus marked near here on the map, but I wonder what this is?
 
 
Some delightful paths through a variety of countryside drew us slowly back to our starting point, before which we happened upon Bridgend Centre, a community centre that encompasses a small and very friendly café. We took advantage of this and enjoyed a round of coffee and biscuits for all three of us, for the princely sum of £1.50! An excellent spot.
 
 
It's across the road from this church, so just head for the spire and you can't miss the café.
 
 
Having started at 10 am, we had finished the walk around 2 pm - about 15 km, with less than 500 metres of ascent. A lovely outing in fine weather, but we drove through a heavy rain shower on the way home.
 
Here's the (highly recommended by Sue and Graeme) route. If you do try to follow it, you need to be fairly attentive to the map. The image below, and the others in this (and any other) posting can be clicked on to see a larger image with good resolution.
 

7 comments:

Sir Hugh said...

I can't believe I've never heard of White Nancy before after criss-crossing the country several times, and after pouring over maps and reading route guides for years. It just show there is always more to discover in our country and landscape.

Sir Hugh said...

I've now looked at the map and see that White Nancy is on the Gritstone Trail which I am aware of but haven't walked.

Phreerunner said...

I've not walked the 35 mile Gritstone Trail in one go, but we often cross its path or walk short sections, especially in the Macclesfield Forest area.

You could walk it most enjoyably in three days, using public transport to the start in Disley and from the finish in Kidsgrove. If I'm around, I'd love to join you for part/all of it.

Buryman said...

I suspect the concrete structure is a capped mine shaft, either coal or a stone mine associated with the nearby quarry.

Phreerunner said...

Thanks Buryman (who?...), that sounds a very likely theory.

Buryman said...

I have been a follower of your blog for many years. I live in Bury and walk with East Lancs LDWA from time to time as I know that you also do.

Stewart Brady

Phreerunner said...

That's great, Stewart. I haven't been out with the LDWA for a while, but will look out for you when I do.
Cheers
Martin